Ballard House Duet Press

Press is coming in for Ballard House Duet, Washington Ensemble Theatre’s co-production with the Custom Made Play Project. Check it out below the jump!

“Olson and Lass are both resourceful performers, who under Erin Kraft’s direction don’t let up on the intensity of their encounters. And Mullin’s dialogue has real bite and sting.”

MISHA BERSON, THE SEATTLE TIMES

 

“An actor’s dream: You’re cast in a lead role that has you onstage for most of the show. The part requires you to exercise virtually every emotion in your repertoire at least once. Your character is intelligent and likable, but has enough flaws to keep you and the audience interested. You even get a few monologues.”

“The tall, animated Olson seems 110 percent comfortable in the skin of Heidi, an ambitious, ethical, but manipulative woman who uses her charms to advance her career as a TV-show host.”

“… Mullin packs heaps of detail into the conversations and monologues—betrayal, men, sibling rivalry, and a genetic curse that only one sister has inherited.”

MARGARET FRIEDMAN, THE SEATTLE WEEKLY

 

“Have I seen a better acted show this year than Ballard House Duet? I don’t think so. It is ferociously bold and unvarnished and about real people, giving the audience very little distance to shelter in.”

“This is to good-enough Seattle theatre as HBO or Showtime productions are to network TV.”

“You just want to watch Olson and Lass keep sparking with this truth, the incompatibility of this accidental, familial love with the adults they are, and how they keep returning to try it again — resentful and singing their sisters’ songs.”

MICHAEL VAN BAKER, THE SUNBREAK

 

“In terms of the acting, both women are excellent in their roles; they are honest, natural, and engaging in their interpretation. They do a great job of playing the characters at the various stages in their lives and are never too trite, exaggerated, or clichéd.”

“As for the script itself, it has some very raw and realistic dialogue, with a lot of psychological weightiness, and I would say that this is its greatest strength. The playwright captures, quite remarkably, the strain, tension, love, and complications of dealing with family.”

SCOTT TAYLOR, DRAMA IN THE HOOD

 

“The Custom Made Play Project proceeds from the radical notion that playwrights and actors should collaborate on new work. That notion shouldn’t be radical, of course. Playwrights wrote with actors in the mix for centuries, before the idea of a “director” was even invented.”

BRENDAN KILEY, THE STRANGER (preview article)